February 2017

South Africa is turning the tide against tuberculosis (TB) one province at a time. This is in part through support from TB programs funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).The recent TB 2016 and the 21st International AIDS Conferences in July provided a platform to showcase work being done in support of the South African National Department of Health (NDOH).The newly awarded USAID TB South Africa project showcased work that was done under its predecessor projects; the TB Project South Africa and TB Care II South Africa.

A strategic response to TB at work: Call for a public-private-civil society mix in South Africa The Role of behaviour change communication in improving community knowledge and practices on TB and HIV in South Africa

Grantee training materials.

Tools for basic TB management and treatment.

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA—Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the biggest scourges there is among infectious diseases, killing nearly 2 million people a year, most in developing countries. It is also notoriously hard and slow to detect in places without top-flight health care systems. Yesterday, researchers reported at the American Chemical Society (ACS) meeting here that they’ve devised a simple new way to diagnose TB, and even distinguish living TB cells from dead ones, which could give doctors an easy way to see whether their anti-TB medications are working.

A new weapon against a deadly infectious disease.

The staff of Fortune and a panel of experts recently named 50 companies to its 2016 Change the World list. Johnson & Johnson is one of them.

 

Three years ago I photographed several women living with tuberculosis and HIV in South African townships not far from Cape Town.

South Africa remains the country with the highest number of people living with HIV (6.5 million), but it is also making major steps in scaling up treatment and prevention services. It now has the biggest HIV treatment program in the world, and transmission rates, in particular mother-to-child, are falling dramatically.

MSF UK (press release)-Oct 25, 2016

Through her grandmother’s love, and the help of new DR-TB drug delamanid, a 16-year-old from Khayelitsha has been given a second chance

CCTV-Oct 11, 2016

The South African health minister says the country is making great strides in combating tuberculosis and HIV. South Africa ranks third in list....